Tag: "Wolfman Jack"

The State of the Disc Jockey – Part 2

| January 29, 2013

A Five-Part RadioInfo Special Feature

Part Two:  The PPM – a DJ’s Downfall

By Jeff McKay
RadioInfo
Special Features Correspondent

NEW YORK — Ask any long-time disc jockey or veteran program director, and they will tell you that two big changes have come along in the past 10-15 years that have had a profound impact on the job of the disc jockey – and ownership rules isn’t one of them.

Radio has always been immediate.  Unlike the magazine, you didn’t have to wait for a whole week to learn the news.  Unlike a newspaper, you didn’t have to wait until the next morning to read the news.  And, even unlike TV, you didn’t have to get your makeup on and interrupt a soap opera to give viewers a breaking news story.  When it comes to radio, a DJ with a “face for radio” could “rip and read” a headline or give the listener a report, simply by taking two seconds to fade down a song.

ppmunitHowever, just as immediate as radio has been, the evolution of the Portable People Meter has been even more instant, and radio has never been the same.

While a ratings diary could give you a broad sample of what a listener writes that they listen to, the PPM instead registers exactly – down to the minute and second – what a listener is actually hearing.  No longer can you just tell that someone is listening between 3:00 pm and 7:00 pm – now you know that they tuned out at 4:02pm and went to another radio station to listen to a traffic report.

Read More

The State of the Disc Jockey

| January 28, 2013

A Five-Part RadioInfo Special Feature

Part One:  Personality Radio is “Dying” – But Still Gets Solid Ratings

By Jeff McKay
RadioInfo
Special Features Correspondent

NEW YORK — There was a time when people in the 1950s and 1960s would huddle next to their radio and  listen to WJW-AM in Cleveland or WINS-AM in New York City to hear Albert James Freed, or Brooklyn’s Robert Weston Smith in the 60s and 70s who spun records on the “Mighty 1090” XERB-FM broadcasting throughout Southern California and “66 WNBC” in New York, or Kemal Amin Kasem, who got his start on the Armed Forces Korea Radio Network and became famous for launching his national “American Top 40.”  They were the epitome of the word “Disc Jockey,” not only spinning vinyl records on a turntable, but having a loyal following and were what every person who ever wanted to stand behind a microphone and play music wanted to be.

Read More